Roseberry Topping Walk & Captain Cooks Monument, from Great Ayton, North York Moors

Roseberry Topping walk at sunset. From Cockshaw hill quarry, near Captain Cook's monument, teesside
An evening glow on this Roseberry Topping walk at sunset. This view is from just above Cockshaw Hill quarry, which is quite near Captain Cook's monument, Teesside



A circular Roseberry Topping walk from Great Ayton via Captain Cooks monument

For anyone who lives where I do (Teesside in North-East England) if you like walking, then it probably first started off as a kid by 'climbing' Roseberry Topping. This small peak can be seen from miles around - a kind of shark fin shape on the rolling distant Cleveland Hills, and calls out to be tackled, and although it isn't actually that high - the views of the Tees Valley are pretty good on a clear day.

For anyone interested in doing a walk in this area that takes in Roseberry Topping - then the below route is the classic walk, (map taken from the walking englishman website)

Starting from Great Ayton - you head north-east towards Roseberry Topping. From there you head along the moors to Captain Cooks monument and then back to Great Ayton. It's a 7 mile walk- which can be done in 2-3hours.

Roseberry Topping walk from Great Ayton, then onto Captain Cooks monument and back to Great Ayton!

My best view of Roseberry Topping at Cockshaw Hill 


Roseberry Topping walk at sunset. From Cockshaw hill quarry, near Captain Cook's monument, teesside
An evening glow looking towards Roseberry Topping at sunset, fom Cockshaw Hill quarry, which is really near Captain Cook's monument, Teesside

I've walked the area quite a few times now and my best view of Robbery Topping has to be the view from Cockshaw Hill Quarry, near Captains Cook Monument. On the ma; route above you can take a little detour of 200m or so off the main path to this view point (when walking up towards Captains Cooks monument as you pas the car park - look out for the metal bench just off the main path to your right - this smaller path will take you to this viewpoint). If you time it right the walk detailed above can bring you close to this point just as the sun is setting. The photo shown above was taken late-summer (1st week in sepetmber) when the heather is in bloom as you can see - and there is plenty of this pink carpet all over the North-York moors this time of year. 





Blog Post by Stuart Hodgson, 'The Hiking Photographer'


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